Spring Flowering Everything changes for Ann Gray when her father dies and her closest friend Jane marries and moves away Ann must give up the independence and purpose she found as mistress of her father s parsonage in

  • Title: Spring Flowering
  • Author: Farah Mendlesohn
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 364
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Everything changes for Ann Gray when her father dies and her closest friend Jane marries and moves away Ann must give up the independence and purpose she found as mistress of her father s parsonage in the country, and move to her uncle and aunt s new style house in the growing city of Birmingham The friendship of Ann s cousins especially the mathematically inclined LouEverything changes for Ann Gray when her father dies and her closest friend Jane marries and moves away Ann must give up the independence and purpose she found as mistress of her father s parsonage in the country, and move to her uncle and aunt s new style house in the growing city of Birmingham The friendship of Ann s cousins especially the mathematically inclined Louisa is some compensation for freedoms curtailed But soon Ann must consider two very different proposals, either of which will bring yet change Should she return to her village home as wife of the new parson Mr Morden Or become companion to the rather deliciously unsettling widow Mrs King

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      Posted by:Farah Mendlesohn
      Published :2019-05-25T20:39:57+00:00

    About “Farah Mendlesohn

    1. Farah Mendlesohn says:

      Farah Mendlesohn is a Hugo Award winning British academic and writer on science fiction In 2005 she won the Hugo Award for Best Related Book for The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction, which she edited with Edward James.Mendlesohn is Professor of Literary History at Anglia Ruskin University, where she is also Head of English and Media She writes on Science Fiction, Fantasy, Children s Literature and Historical Fiction She received her D.Phil in History from the University of York in 1997.Her book Rhetorics of Fantasy won the BSFA award for best non fiction book in 2009 the book was also nominated for both Hugo and World Fantasy Awards.In 2010 she was twice nominated for Hugo Awards in the Best Related Books category.She was the editor of Foundation The International Review of Science Fiction from 2002 to 2007 She formerly was Reviews Editor of Quaker Studies.



    2 thoughts on “Spring Flowering

    1. A f/f historical at a non-eyewatering price is still a rare and precious thing, plus I heard the author speak at a conference and she was amazing, so I was on this like a rat up a drainpipe. The historical grounding is amazing. This is the most vivid, immersive daily life depiction, and of relatively normal middle class people too. I was fascinated by the manufactories in particular, and the way women's position in work was changing, but all the details of life and work were gloriously real. Wha [...]

    2. Well, this is certainly different than what I've been reading lately. Still pretty, still gay (of course), but I was transported to a world of bonnets and corsets and paragraphs picturesque landscaping. And it was a welcome change! You will learn a lot about the various settings and if the plot and action keeps a hold of you, it won't be dreary.Ann is interesting and honestly someone I could picture as a lead in the lastest Netflix originals. To see her romance blossom is a thing of beauty, but [...]

    3. 2.5 starsThis story is told in third person and completely from Ann’s point of view. As per the blurb, which is extremely telling, everything changes for Ann when her father dies. She moves in with her Aunt and Uncle, and whereas the noise and a busy household are unsettling, Ann’s biggest hurdle to overcome is how to fill her day. With not much more to do than mend clothes and iron, like Ann, I found myself incredibly bored.The pacing of this story was extremely slow. There was no urgency, [...]

    4. Spring Flowering by Farah Mendlesohn.Wow, ok… so it was really in the last 20% of the book when we started to get to the meat of the story. Before that it was as someone aptly described “this-is-a-story-of-what-Ann-did-next”. After what you may ask?Well for that we better start at the beginning.Ann Gray is the bookish daughter of parson William Gray and we enter the story as Ann is sitting at her father’s death-bed reminiscing about the people she lost in her life - her brother John died [...]

    5. Spring Flowering by Farah Mendlesohn is a gentle, domestic Regency romance, more in the vein of Jane Austen with its parson’s daughters and the family dynamics of middle class families “in trade”, than in the vein of Georgette Heyer’s dashing aristocrats and gothic perils. Ann Gray’s life is disrupted by the death of her father, the village parson, and she joins the bustling household of her cousins in Birmingham where the family business manufacturing buttons, jewelry, and other small [...]

    6. This story was extraordinarily dull, but not at all boring.I don't believe there was a single joke in the whole book. Hardly any conflict at all. Just serious, sober, religious, hard-working, kind-hearted people going about their business.I realise I'm not really selling it, but I did enjoy it. It's clearly very historically accurate. Some of this is a bit superfluous, like the meticulous updates on Birmingham building works. The rest of the history is seamlessly integrated into the story - the [...]

    7. Not really a romance novel, more of a coming-into-one's-own novel. Odd, in that the details are clearly meticulously researched, but the tone of the whole doesn't feel plausible. And quite dull, but in a plodding, comfortable way. If you're looking for f/f Georgette Heyer - this ain't it.

    8. I loved this a lot - but I could have loved it more. I adored Our Heroine (those who recall my problems with Persuasion and wanting to hear about the older sister who managed the accounts will not be surprised), I loved the setting and the web of supporting characters and the way that Anne's prior passionate friendship remains part of the picture. I just. Didn't really grok the main ship. Or I did, but I wanted it further developed. I love the way it was worked out: keep everything in the family [...]

    9. ok so i have been DYING from the complete lack of f/f historical that isn’t depressing as fuck and this book does fit the bill. so of course i picked this up IMMEDIATELY when i saw it recommended on twitter by one of my favorite authors. things that are great about this book: happy ending! lesbians just getting to live together in peace! fun family dynamics! so much research and time and love clearly went into writing this!BUT the pacing really threw me off my groove, at times this read more l [...]

    10. Farah Mendlesohn is best known for her literary criticism, much of it in the areas of fantasy, science fiction, and children’s literature. To these scholarly credits she must now add the accolade of a writer of delightful queer historical romance. Spring Flowering is the story of Ann Gray, a 27-year-old parson’s daughter who finds herself on the brink of a life of her own following the death of her father. Leaving the parsonage where she grew up for the new world of Birmingham, where her unc [...]

    11. I have read way too many books by authors from the 19th century where the female protagonist (or their best friend or sister or whoever) ended up either dead, mad or married. I'm not saying that I didn't to some extent enjoy reading them but what I really wanted was for Lizzy and Charlotte from "Pride and Prejudice" to have their HEA. Anyhow, this is a Regency romance without dashing aristocrats of either gender but rather well-heeled merchant families. There is a bit of social commentary going [...]

    12. I adore historical fiction, but it's very hard to find historical lesbian fiction where one of the women doesn't end up dead. This hits all the right notes: a Regency story that's really immersive, as well as the sort of subtle romance you expect of the era (especially when gay relationships are involved). Some people apparently find the book too slow and plodding, but there's nothing I love more than loving descriptions of the era with weird archaic words I've never seen before and have to look [...]

    13. I found this a charming, light read. The focus is more on the central character than on a specific relationship. It wasn't clear to me until fairly well into the story where the relationships were going - as other reviewers have noted, this is odd for a romance, but highly effective for a story about Ann's journey of personal and sexual discovery. The latter worked for me because I quickly liked Ann. (That said, I would read a sequel from Louisa's point of view, because I could really like her t [...]

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