Still a Family A Story about Homelessness A little girl and her parents have lost their home and must live in a homeless shelter Even worse due to a common shelter policy her dad must live in a men s shelter separated from her and her mom

  • Title: Still a Family: A Story about Homelessness
  • Author: Brenda Reeves Sturgis Jo-Shin Lee
  • ISBN: 9780807577073
  • Page: 117
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A little girl and her parents have lost their home and must live in a homeless shelter Even worse, due to a common shelter policy, her dad must live in a men s shelter, separated from her and her mom Despite these circumstances, the family still finds time to be together They meet at the park to play hide and seek, slide on slides, and pet puppies While the young girlA little girl and her parents have lost their home and must live in a homeless shelter Even worse, due to a common shelter policy, her dad must live in a men s shelter, separated from her and her mom Despite these circumstances, the family still finds time to be together They meet at the park to play hide and seek, slide on slides, and pet puppies While the young girl wishes for better days when her family is together again under a roof of their very own, she continues to remind herself that they re still a family even in times of separation.

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      Posted by:Brenda Reeves Sturgis Jo-Shin Lee
      Published :2019-04-03T17:21:35+00:00

    About “Brenda Reeves Sturgis Jo-Shin Lee

    1. Brenda Reeves Sturgis Jo-Shin Lee says:

      Brenda Reeves Sturgis Jo-Shin Lee Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Still a Family: A Story about Homelessness book, this is one of the most wanted Brenda Reeves Sturgis Jo-Shin Lee author readers around the world.



    2 thoughts on “Still a Family: A Story about Homelessness

    1. The author, Brenda Reeves Sturgis writes that she wanted a way to give a voice to children who are homeless, living with their mother and with their father in a second shelter just for men. And of all the sweet things included or happening, they are "still" a family. Illustrated in child-like drawings, this young girl talks about the rows of cots and the noise, standing in line for long minutes for meals and playing with another girl and sharing her doll. Each one gives it a name. It's her birth [...]

    2. I think this would be more of a 4, but the mere fact that you rarely, if ever, find the topic of homelessness in a children's book (let alone a picture book) made me love it to the point of a 5. This is the story of a young girl who lives in a shelter with her mom, and her dad has to live in a different shelter (as they're typically gender-separated). Despite this, and despite how hard her life may seem and how much she longs for the comforts of having her family together and her bedroom, she st [...]

    3. A really important book to share with all readers. The message of still being a family will be important for someone to hear.

    4. One thing I can tell you with absolute certainty from having worked in struggling communities is that children in disadvantaged neighborhoods are still children, and their families are still families. These families might look different from the ones we typically see in portrayed in picture books, and their lives might be different, but that doesn’t make them any less valid, any less real, any less important. Families are still families, no matter their material situation, and no child should [...]

    5. As other reviewers have commented, it is not easy to find homelessness dealt with in books for children, much less in a picture book. In this one, illustrated with drawings that resemble colorful sketches that a child might make, readers encounter a girl and her mother who are living in one shelter while their father lives in a different one. The text and images show the family trying to maintain its closeness despite the challenges of shelter life, which can be noisy, crowded, and provide littl [...]

    6. This important picture book shows how a family who is experiencing homelessness continues to foster connections that demonstrate their love for one another. The little girl who narrates the book must stay in one shelter with her mother while her father stays at a different one. They sleep on cots among other people and the little girl must share her doll with the other children there. Sometimes they meet her father in the park to spend time together, though most of the time her parents are out l [...]

    7. Sturgis, Brenda Reeves Still a Family, illustrated by Jo-Shin Lee. PICTURE BOOK. Albert Whitman, 2017. $16.99. Content: G.It's hard to feel like a family when you and your mother live in one homeless shelter and your father lives in another. Still, the family in this story makes it work, even as they hope that one day soon they will be reunited under a roof of their own.Still a Family deals with a very important topic that isn't addressed very often in children's stories. Not only could it help [...]

    8. What a sad, but necessary book. This book right away makes you think that mom or dad are divorcing or one has passed away - but it's neither. This book tells us a story about a family who are homeless. Dad stays in a men's shelter while mom and daughter are in the women's shelter. They wait in line for the soup kitchen and they stay under a tarp in the rain. It's so sad that this story ever has to be told. Recommended Purchase. Grades K+. Not recommended for preschool just because of the depth o [...]

    9. This is a really nice book explaining to a child how it is to be homeless written through a child's eye. She talks about how her family is separated due to multiple reasons (gender, parent tiring to find work, etc.), but how they are still a family. It's really endearing how the child finds hope, is kind and shares her doll with other children, and how sometimes it's hard for her family to be separated, but they're still a family, no matter where they are at.

    10. While reading Sturgis' book in a one room library, I was struck by the watercolor illustrations and the youthfulness of the homeless parents. The father especially stood out with his simple smile and dotted, growing mustache. For the child in this story, being homeless is terrible and long, and the happy ending is found in the same refrain, "still a family" instead of in getting a home.

    11. Children who are homeless rarely see themselves portrayed in books. Brenda Reeves Sturgis and Jo-Shin Lee have brought us a gentle read about the trials of homelessness and its everyday realities. This quiet book will also be a great discussion starter to answer questions young children might have about the subject. The Author's note and resources provide more information. For ages 3 - 8.

    12. A little girl and her parents have lost their home and are living in shelters: her mom and her in one, her dad in another. But they are still a family.Although I initially thought the book was kind of a bummer, it's a fact of life. It really has the potential to reach out to children and teach compassion.

    13. A family - mother, father, young daughter - are separated because of the misfortune of no longer having their own home. The father stays nights in a men's shelter, while his wife and daughter stay nights in a women's shelter. But they're still a family. They meet during the day and go to the park together or try to find work - and they're still a family.

    14. A family strives to continue doing all the things make them family even though their living situation is unstable. I love having the voice of the little girl in the family as the narrator. The author also does a good job of explaining the problems of homeless family in a caring way. Not preachy at all. This would be a great book to donate to shelters, and to share in story times.

    15. This book is a soft, gentle vehicle to explain homelessness. It shows how homeless shelters work. And it emphasizes that family is a value even when families are living separately due to poverty. A critical sentence from the author's note: "Sometimes a few paychecks are all that separate those who have a home from those who live in a shelter."

    16. It is rare to find a children's book about homelessness, but this one makes the situation somewhat uplifting even through its challenges. I wanted some kind of resolution and to see the family come out of it, but maybe that's not what the point of the book was meant to be.

    17. Does the job presenting the subject of homelessness to a young audience, but nothing exceptional. Still an important title to know -- for older readers, Crenshaw (Applegate) handles the topic quite well.

    18. A book that tackles homelessness with gentleness and subtlety while also pulling no punches. There are no euphemisms for the sake of sugar coating here. The author respects the young readers’ intellect and ability to process difficult subject matter.

    19. An important book for kids to read, it shares what it can be like to be homeless from a young girl's POV.

    20. Beautifully written story about a little girl and her parents who are homeless, but maintain their hope.

    21. An all too rare and important story. A relatable message of still being a family despite hard times and physical distance.

    22. A heartfelt book about a family experiencing homelessness, the childlike crayon illustrations add to the tone and mood beautifully. The sentiment is lovely.

    23. This is an important book for all library collections. Everyone deserves to see themselves represented in a book, even if it's a temporay situation.

    24. 2017. Realistic fiction 1. Good discussion started book/read aloud. About a homeless family still being a family even if they don't/can't live together.

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