South of the Yangtze Chinese civilization first developed years ago in North China along the middle and lower reaches of the Yellow River And the Yellow River remained the center of Chinese civilization for the next

  • Title: South of the Yangtze
  • Author: Bill Porter
  • ISBN: 9781619027343
  • Page: 389
  • Format: Paperback
  • Chinese civilization first developed 5,000 years ago in North China along the middle and lower reaches of the Yellow River And the Yellow River remained the center of Chinese civilization for the next 4,000 years Then a thousand years ago, this changed A thousand years ago, the center of Chinese civilization moved to the Yangtze And the Yangtze, not the Yellow River, hChinese civilization first developed 5,000 years ago in North China along the middle and lower reaches of the Yellow River And the Yellow River remained the center of Chinese civilization for the next 4,000 years Then a thousand years ago, this changed A thousand years ago, the center of Chinese civilization moved to the Yangtze And the Yangtze, not the Yellow River, has remained the center of its civilization A thousand years ago, the Chinese came up with a name for this new center of its civilization They called it Chiangnan, meaning South of the River, the river in question, of course, being the Yangtze The Chinese still call this region Chiangnan Nowadays it includes the northern parts of Chekiang and Kiangsi provinces and the southern parts of Anhui and Kiangsu And some would even add the northern part of Hunan But it s not just a region on the map It s a region in the Chinese spirit It s hard to put it into words Ask a dozen Chinese what Chiangnan means, and they ll give you a dozen different answers For some the word conjures forests of pine and bamboo For others, they envision hillsides of tea, or terraces of rice, or lakes of lotuses and fish Or they might imagine Zen monasteries, or Taoist temples, or artfully constructed gardens, or mist shrouded peaks Oddly enough, no one ever mentions the region s cities, which include some of the largest in the world Somehow, whatever else it might mean to people, Chiangnan means a landscape, a landscape and a culture defined by mist, a landscape and a culture that lacks the harder edges of the arid North.In the Fall of 1991, Bill Porter decided to travel through this vaporous land, following the old post roads that still connected its administrative centers and scenic wonders, its most famous hometowns and graves, its factories and breweries, its dreamlike memories and its mist, and he was joined on this journey by his poet and photographer friends, Finn Wilcox and Steve Johnson South of the Yangtze is a record in words and black and white images of their trip.

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      389 Bill Porter
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      Posted by:Bill Porter
      Published :2019-06-27T08:42:15+00:00

    About “Bill Porter

    1. Bill Porter says:

      Bill Porter is an American author who translates under the pen name Red Pine Chinese pinyin Ch S ng He is a translator and interpreter of Chinese texts, primarily Taoist and Buddhist, including poetry and S tras.He also wrote books about Buddhist hermits Road to Heaven and his travels in China Zen Baggage A Pilgrimage to China Yellow River Odyssey.



    2 thoughts on “South of the Yangtze

    1. The author made a trip. for that i have to read about the Chinese culture being started precisely 5000 years before 1991. how about the travel? well "I decided to travel through Chiangnan, following the old post roads that still connect its administrative centers and scenic wonders." Good. But why? How come? Why this decision? Finally it makes sense. A dull person wishes to do something special. An exotic trip seems like a good answer especially when you have nothing better to do. But the dull p [...]

    2. This book was an enjoyable, quick read. I could have done without the stories of getting stoned or bragging about what a great Buddhist he is. Still, I found it interesting and if I ever get to China I will use this book as a guide.

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