Confessions of an Art Addict A patron of art since the s Peggy Guggenheim in a candid self portrait provides an insider s view of the early days of modern art with revealing accounts of her eccentric wealthy family her p

  • Title: Confessions of an Art Addict
  • Author: Peggy Guggenheim
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 454
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • A patron of art since the 1930s, Peggy Guggenheim, in a candid self portrait, provides an insider s view of the early days of modern art, with revealing accounts of her eccentric wealthy family, her personal and professional relationships, and often surprising portrayals of the artists themselves Here is a book that captures a valuable chapter in the history of modern artA patron of art since the 1930s, Peggy Guggenheim, in a candid self portrait, provides an insider s view of the early days of modern art, with revealing accounts of her eccentric wealthy family, her personal and professional relationships, and often surprising portrayals of the artists themselves Here is a book that captures a valuable chapter in the history of modern art, as well as the spirit of one of its greatest advocates.

    The Confessions work by Augustine Britannica The Confessions, spiritual self examination by Saint Augustine, written in Latin as Confessiones about ce The book tells of Augustine s restless youth and of the stormy spiritual voyage that had ended some years before the writing in the haven of the Roman Catholic church. TLA Releasing US Confessions To download images, click image Right click and select save image as Synopsis Take a peak under the surface of any gay man, and who knows what you ll find Confessions of a Cookbook Queen I was recently hosted by Disney World and am sharing my experience All thoughts and opinions are completely my own If you know me even a tiny bit, you know that I am a holiday fanatic. THE CONFESSIONS OF SAINT AUGUSTINE THE CONFESSIONS OF SAINT AUGUSTINE AD Translated by Edward Bouverie Pusey Book I , bytes Book II , bytes Book III , bytes Book IV , bytes Welcome to the Book of Concord Welcome to the Book of Concord s home on the Internet If you are unfamiliar with the Book of Concord, please consult the helpful explanations available in the left hand column under the Introductions section otherwise, the texts of the Lutheran Confessions are listed under the heading The Lutheran Confessions. Taboo Confessions Post An Anonymous Confession You must be over the age of to view these juicy anonymous posted confessions Taboo Confessions contains material that some viewers may find offensive. cuckold Dictionary Definition Vocabulary A cuckold is a man who has been betrayed by his wife If your wife cuckolds you, she is cheating on you with a different man. Book of Confessions The Book of Confessions contains the creeds and confessions of the Presbyterian Church U.S.A The contents are the Nicene Creed, the Apostles Creed, the Scots Confession, the Heidelberg Catechism, the Second Helvetic Confession, the Westminster Confession of Faith, the Shorter Catechism, the Larger Catechism, the Theological Declaration of Confessions of an Advertising Man David Ogilvy, Sir Alan Confessions of an Advertising Man David Ogilvy, Sir Alan Parker on FREE shipping on qualifying offers A new edition of the timeless business classic featured on Mad Men as fresh and relevant now as the day it was written We admire people who

    • Best Read [Peggy Guggenheim] ↠ Confessions of an Art Addict || [Christian Book] PDF ✓
      454 Peggy Guggenheim
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Peggy Guggenheim] ↠ Confessions of an Art Addict || [Christian Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Peggy Guggenheim
      Published :2019-01-07T03:57:52+00:00

    About “Peggy Guggenheim

    1. Peggy Guggenheim says:

      Peggy Guggenheim was an American art collector Born Marguerite Guggenheim to a wealthy New York City family, she was the daughter of Benjamin Guggenheim, who went down with the Titanic in 1912 and the niece of Solomon R Guggenheim, who would establish the Solomon R Guggenheim Foundation Peggy s father was of Swiss German Jewish origin, and her mother Jewish, German, and Dutch.



    2 thoughts on “Confessions of an Art Addict

    1. Whether you'll enjoy Peggy Guggenheim's autobiography or not depends on what you're after. If you want deep insight into her life and reflections on art, you're bound to be disappointed. If you enjoy reading about rich, eccentric bohemians gallivanting around Europe in the first half of the century, forever hunting for summer houses, you're in luck. Guggenheim is not a gifted writer, and some may find her prose off-putting. I found her laconic delivery amusing, intentional or not. Every shocking [...]

    2. Being in the proximity of Modernism feels like a backstage pass to your favourite band's gig. Which is kind of awesome.I was quite intrigued by Peggy's life and choice of men, but I eventually arrived at the conclusion that one mustn't say too much about other people's memoirs and definitely mustn't judge based on their own value system. So there you are: if you're into Cubism, Abstract Expressionism and Surrealism, give it a try and don't be too harsh on her.

    3. Gran bella vita ma nessuna (proprio nessuna) dote per la scrittura: sembra la lista della spesa (un po’ più noiosa). Molto autoassolutoria Peggy nella sua ricerca della felicità: non fa altro che correre di qua e di là, comprare e/o affittare case e arredarle, bere con i suoi mariti amici amanti (in combinazione variabile, a volte racchiusi in una sola persona), e dedicarsi ai suoi amati quadri. Perché, anche se ne ha mantenuti parecchi di artisti, amava più le opere di quanto stimasse gl [...]

    4. I have mixed feeling about this book. Someone who led the life Peggy Guggenheim led, living through two wars, moving between France, Italy, England, and America, and mixing with so many well-known writers and artists has to have been an interesting person with an interesting life. And while the first half of the book kept my interest as it went on I became a bit annoyed by what started to just seem like a laundry list of events and people without much explanation or introspection. Things like, " [...]

    5. Peggy Guggenheim led a rich and interesting life. Although, to her regret, her formal education did not extend beyond high school, she more than compensated for that deficiency by reading widely, traveling extensively, and immersing herself in a culture of writers and artists, many of whose careers she launched or significantly advanced. The list of her friends / acquaintances / husbands / lovers is formidable, including (to mention just a very few) Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Man Ray, Marcel D [...]

    6. Peggy Guggenheim is no doubt a fascinating person who lived an amazingly interesting life. I loved hearing about her relationships with famous artists and all the drama in her life (there is an extreme abundance of drama). It started to get a bit gossipy to me and I rolled my eyes quite a bit at the immature and bad behavior (which is a lot). I'm glad I read it. It could use some editing.

    7. Me he debatido, durante un tiempo, el darle las dos o las tres estrellas, y pese a que tengo razones para darle el aprobado tengo otras que no me lo permiten. Como acercamiento al arte moderno cuando como yo, se tienen conocimientos prácticamente nulos, es, digamos, adecuado, para un pequeño, muy pequeño acercamiento. Pero sin embargo, confieso que a pesar de que al final me ha aportado alguna que otra cosilla, sino fuera porque lo tengo que leer para clase, no habría pasado de la segunda p [...]

    8. Such an entertaining and lively read. What I love is the tone where every objective difficulty (such as, ahem, World War II) is either an adventure or a silly thing that keeps Peggy from opening yet another gallery or organizing the next show. Art in the broad sense is what matters the most.You can read it as a gossip column about the artists and art of the century (pun intended). And you will be right. Or you can read it as an account of an extraordinary human life. And you will be right, undou [...]

    9. I've visited the Peggy Guggenheim museum in Venice 3 times over the pass 15 years! I think its one of my favourite museums. So its easy to say I admire Peggy, the museum and her love for collecting art. So I finally read her book after visiting the museum in the summer of 2014 and I could not put the book down! I was in awe of her luxurious life - not always in a good way though - she was very rich, had no boundaries, naive and spoiled - at the same time very giving. She was a rebel. It was intr [...]

    10. This at first reads - irritatingly - like the diary of a rich spoilt brat, and Peggy Guggenheim's behaviour (think drinking champagne at cafe terraces while refugees stream into Paris fleeing the nazis) is at times shocking. At the same time this obsession with personal freedom makes her a subversive figure. Going against the expectations imposed on women in the 30s and 40s, she forged her own path (and yes, the money helped a great deal). This autobiography, written mostly in the 40s (with post [...]

    11. During WWI, while still in her teens, Guggenheim inherited $450,000--a LOT of money at the time.Given that she knew and supported many famous artists, traveled widely, and lived a highly unconventional life, her recounting of it is understated, somewhat detached, as though she doesn't expect it to be particularly interesting to readers. She deeply grieved some major losses: of her father on the Titanic, a long-time lover due to medical incompetence, and a friend in a car accident. The lasting lo [...]

    12. Peggy Guggenheim had a fascinating life, and this, her autobiography is a quick and entertaining read, filled with interesting anecdotes about her artist friends, including Max Ernst, Jackson Pollock, and many others. Her collection and her palazzo in Venice is one of my favorite places in Europe and so I really enjoyed reading more about it. She is important part of the history of 20th century art.

    13. It's interesting to know how the modern art of the XX century got support from a "poor" jewish lady from two very rich and well connected families. Maybe Jackson Pollock own's her his success and other american artists their mischance.But I would not rely on her art authority as she explain in the book that among all the seven tragedies of her life some were that she didn't bought a Miro or a Picasso when they where cheap, that she sold a Kandinsky because her friends told her that that painting [...]

    14. I abandoned, rather than 'finished' this book, which is a rare thing for me to do but the juvenile naivety of the writing was like gall to my brain! I have a deep fascination with the art world, with the way art collections are personally curated and I love the Guggenheim legacy but not even that passion could drive me to carry on reading. I'll get a more objective biography next time this one just didn't cut it.

    15. It's an entertaining and fun read. Especially when simultaneously googling images of the art and artists Peggy Guggenheim tells about. It is filled with interesting anecdotes about her art collecting adventures. On the other hand I missed the inner life of her. But I guess that's not really the point of this book.

    16. Este o perspectivă romantică asupra vieții unei femei care iubea arta într-o perioadă în care războiul era la modă. Cartea descrie viața ei în funcție de artiștii pe care i-a întâlnit, de expozițiile pe care le-a făcut și de iubirile ei, cu toate că a trăit prin două războaie mondiale și multe alte dificultăți.

    17. Fun at first, but it's a very shallow "confession" with lots of name-dropping. My take-away from this book is that she had lots of fun with Art and Artists and was terribly disappointed/disheartened by the way Art became a big money investment to many people, and, thus, lost its soul. The Gore Vidal introduction is worth reading. I rather wish he had wrote the whole book.

    18. Peggy Guggenheim came from a privileged background, and at an early age acquired a small fortune (her father died in the sinking of the Titanic, though I can't say I remember him from the movie, har-har). Over time she used this (and more!) money to open a gallery in London in the Thirties. She had shows for a lot of big names (Cocteau, Arp) and even married one of them (Max Ernst). Through the help of all these big names in art, Guggenheim grew to understand and appreciate painting, particularl [...]

    19. If anyone wants to read a book on Peggy Guggenheim, this is it. She was a remarkable figure, drifting after her father went down on the Titanic with his mistress, finally settling in Europe during the roaring 20s.Peggy was attracted not so much to the Lost Generation as she was to the Surrealists and her taste in art was formed through the unlikely combination of influences, Bernard Berenson and Marcel Duchamp. By a series of unfortunate events, to include WWII, she managed to acquire one of the [...]

    20. In the hook of Vampire Weekend's "Taxicab," Ezra Koenig sings, "In the shadow of your first attack / I was questioning and looking back / you said 'Baby, we don't speak of that' / like a real aristocrat." I thought of this line over and over again over the course of Peggy Guggenheim's memoir. By almost any account, she lived a fascinating and unique life. Yet "Confessions of an Art Addict" reads more like a detached list of events than a story, let alone a candid reckoning with the turning point [...]

    21. I've heard all the rumors and was very intrigued to read this autobiography. Well, none of my questions were really answered. Guggenhiem seemed to have a very emotional coldness about her. She enjoyed writing about all the famous artists she spent her time with, but she omitted a lot about her family and personal life. Yet she had no problem talking about losing her virginity. The only thing I really got out of this book was that she was a wealthy, privileged lady, who with the help of some very [...]

    22. I am sorry to say, but this is the worst prose I've read during the last 10 years I'm afraid. I have admired this lady and her amazing museum in Venice is one of my favorite museums in the world for many years and wanted to read her biography for a long time. I still admire her for her courage to go after what she wanted, transgress tradition and rules imposed by society and the precursor role she had in bringing modern art and expressionism to Europe.But I really expected more depth, more intel [...]

    23. As crazy and mad as Peggy herself must have been. The memoirs are a complete mess, but somehow still wonderfully endearing. The writing isn't much, however I did get a sense of Peggy, how she must have spoke and how she must have lived.Her life is enviable. Enough money to do as she pleased, swanning about Europe, London, New York - each time with a different lover or husband. Her life wasn't dull and I wished to sit in the cafes and galleries with her, talking until 4am about art and life and a [...]

    24. An entertaining but rather long memoir of the art collector Peggy Guggenheim. I found the first 3/4 of the book most interesting as she details her various love affairs as well as her blossoming fascination with modern art and the many artists she met and befriended. The last section of the book is dry and is more like a log of the later events of her life; indeed, she wrote it at a different point in her life. However, the stories of her Bohemian adventures are great and pretty incredible consi [...]

    25. This memoir shows an art scene amidst turmoil and fragmentation, during a time of cultural and political clashing, told by a privately wealthy philanthropist, not altogether naive of her surroundings, but perhaps aluff to some of it. She is a great name in the biographies of the Surrealists, a catalyst to their popularity and promotion. As an American heiress, she was able to save a point in European art, along with others, for the world. An enjoyable read of a woman who was full of whimsy and w [...]

    26. This book is just too poorly written to warrant a higher rating. For someone who lived such an amazing life, living in USA, France, England and Italy and having associated with some amazing people like Ernst, Pollock, Rothko and Capote, you'd think she would have hired someone to write her memoir to give her life justice. She offers no detail, introspection, or reflection. It's a superficial account of what she did. Furthermore, there is no evidence she knew the first thing about art, its compos [...]

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